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6 minute read

Which Wide-Angle Lens for Landscapes?

Improve your view with a dedicated wide-angle lens and watch the world of landscape photography open up

From the glorious drama of the mountains and coasts, to the great openness of the plains and deserts, and even the tangle of woodland and man-made canyons of the city, landscapes are one of the most enduring photographic subjects around. But while you can tackle landscapes using any sort of lens, wide-angle models have become the staple of scenic photography – and with very good reason.

Why is that? It’s down to several things, but one of the most important is how a wide-angle lens gives you a much broader view than a normal lens and lets you take in bigger views without moving your feet. There are more reasons for using specialist wide-angle lenses for landscapes, which we’ll look at below, as well as showcasing the best dedicated wide-angle and ultra wide-angle lenses for FUJIFILM X Series cameras.

So, if you’re thinking of getting into landscape photography and want to push things a little further than your standard zoom allows, read on…

Learn photography with Fujifilm, Which Wide-Angle Lens for Landscapes?

Photo © Lee Varis | Created at 23mm

What Is a Wide-Angle Lens?

Technically, wide-angle lenses are those with focal lengths shorter than a ‘normal’ lens. But what’s ‘normal’? That’s based on a diagonal measurement of the individual camera’s sensor size. On an X Series camera, normal lenses are around 28mm, so anything under 28mm is wide angle. And that includes models with focal lengths like 16mm, 18mm, 23mm, and so on.

Learn photography with Fujifilm, Which Wide-Angle Lens for Landscapes?

Because of variations between camera types and sensor sizes, what’s considered wide angle varies, too. So, actually, the easiest way to work out if a lens is a wide angle is to simply look at the angle of view it gives. This will be ‘true’ no matter what the sensor size and can be found in the lens’s specifications. It tells you, in degrees, how much of the scene you’ll be able to record. The higher the number, the wider the view. Lenses with an angle of view of about 60° and greater are wide angle.

Learn photography with Fujifilm, Which Wide-Angle Lens for Landscapes?

Photo © David Kingham | Created at 8mm

What About Ultra Wide-Angle Lenses?

Ultra wide-angle lenses are those with a view that’s even wider than a regular wide-angle model. On X Series bodies, you can assume these are around 14mm or below. In terms of angle of view, look for lenses with an angle of view of about 90° or more.

Learn photography with Fujifilm, Which Wide-Angle Lens for Landscapes?

Photo © David Kingham | Created at 12mm

What Makes Wide-Angles Great for Landscapes?

First, there’s the large angle of view. This lets you fit very big subjects into a frame without needing to move backwards, which is why wide angles are also useful for interiors. So rather than needing to pick out a broad mountainside or valley in multiple shots, you can do it all in one go.

Learn photography with Fujifilm, Which Wide-Angle Lens for Landscapes?

Photo © David Kingham | Created at 23mm

It’s also easier to put the viewer ‘in your position’ with a wide-angle lens, because although the perspective of these lenses is different to the human eye, the angle of view is more similar to human vision. A picture made at a focal length of 50mm will always feel slightly at arm’s length in comparison.

A wide-angle lens’s shorter focal length means it’s also easier to create a very large depth-of-field, and that’s a perfect fit for landscapes. A large depth-of-field means you’ll get a picture that looks sharp from front to back, so everything from the blades of grass in the foreground to the snow-capped mountains on the horizon is full of glorious detail.

Wide-angle lenses can also help to add more depth to a scene. Again, this is due to the different perspective they create compared to your eye. The wider the lens you use, the further off the horizon will seem, while close-up objects will look larger in comparison. This means you get more separation between them, stopping pictures from looking cluttered.

You’ll also find a wide-angle lens will focus relatively close to the camera, so you can pick out lots of detail in the foregrounds of your landscape, like the texture of rocks and sand, the leaves of plants, or the patterns in ice, while still enjoying a big and beautiful view.

Learn photography with Fujifilm, Which Wide-Angle Lens for Landscapes?

Photo © Elia Locardi | Created at 11.5mm

Which Wide Angle Is Right for You?

Like all lenses, wide-angle and ultra wide-angle models come in all sorts of shapes and sizes and have various features for different situations. So, the one to pick depends on what sort of landscapes you’re going to be photographing, and how.

Wide-angle zooms, like the FUJINON XF8-16mmF2.8 R LM WR and XF10-24mmF4 R OIS, will give you a broad choice of focal lengths, so you can frame subjects of different sizes without needing to swap to a different optic.

Learn photography with Fujifilm, Which Wide-Angle Lens for Landscapes?

Photo © Bryan Minear

Wide-angle prime lenses have a fixed focal length, so they’re not as versatile, but this means they can be relatively small and light compared to zooms, and are potentially easier to pack and move around with. Prime lenses will also most likely have wider available apertures than zooms. The latter is especially useful if you’re planning to frame low-light landscapes.

Learn photography with Fujifilm, Which Wide-Angle Lens for Landscapes?

Photo © Simon Thomas

As well as the maximum aperture, which will open up low-light photography, it’s worth considering the minimum aperture setting and the number of aperture blades used in the lens. The former tells you how much you can stop down the lens to get longer exposures and reveal moving water and clouds in your landscapes, while the number of aperture blades can have a pronounced effect on the shape of ‘sunstars’ – the star shape you get around the sun or other points of light in the frame when using small apertures. For instance, an even number of aperture blades gives the same number of points to the star, while with an uneven number of blades you’ll get double the number – so a seven-bladed aperture will give 14 points.

One other factor to consider is weather-resistance, designated as WR on X Series lenses. If your lens has this, you’ll be able to make images in more wet and dusty conditions.

Check out the wide-angle options for your X Series camera below.

Wide-Angle Lenses for X Series

XF14mmF2.8 R

Focal Length
14mm
Angle of View
90.8°
Max Aperture
F2.8
Min Aperture
F22
Number of Aperture Blades
7
Focus Range
Normal 30cm - ∞ / Macro 18cm - ∞
Weather-Resistance
No
Dimensions
65x58.4mm
Weight
235g

XF16mmF1.4 R WR

Focal Length
16mm
Angle of View
83.2°
Max Aperture
F1.4
Min Aperture
F16
Number of Aperture Blades
9
Focus Range
15cm - ∞
Weather-Resistance
Yes
Dimensions
73.4x73mm
Weight
375g

XF16mmF2.8 R WR

Focal Length
16mm
Angle of View
83.2°
Max Aperture
F2.8
Min Aperture
F22
Number of Aperture Blades
9
Focus Range
17cm - ∞
Weather-Resistance
Yes
Dimensions
60x45.4mm
Weight
155g

XF18mmF2 R

Focal Length
18mm
Angle of View
76.5°
Max Aperture
F2
Min Aperture
F16
Number of Aperture Blades
7
Focus Range
Normal 80cm - ∞ / Macro 18cm - 2m
Weather-Resistance
No
Dimensions
64.5x33.7mm
Weight
116g

XF23mmF1.4 R

Focal Length
23mm
Angle of View
63.4°
Max Aperture
F1.4
Min Aperture
F16
Number of Aperture Blades
7
Focus Range
Normal 60cm - ∞ / Macro 28cm - ∞
Weather-Resistance
No
Dimensions
72x63mm
Weight
300g

XF23mmF2 R WR

Focal Length
23mm
Angle of View
63.4°
Max Aperture
F2
Min Aperture
F16
Number of Aperture Blades
9
Focus Range
22cm - ∞
Weather-Resistance
Yes
Dimensions
60x51.9mm
Weight
180g

XF8-16mmF2.8 R LM WR

Focal Length
8-16mm
Angle of View
121° - 83.2°
Max Aperture
F2.8
Min Aperture
F22
Number of Aperture Blades
9
Focus Range
25cm - ∞
Weather-Resistance
Yes
Dimensions
88x121.5mm
Weight
805g

XF10-24mmF4 R OIS

Focal Length
10-24mm
Angle of View
110° - 61.2°
Max Aperture
F4
Min Aperture
F22
Number of Aperture Blades
7
Focus Range
Normal 50cm - ∞ / Macro 24cm - ∞
Weather-Resistance
No
Dimensions
78x87mm (Wide Setting)
Weight
410g